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McCrea Cellars

McCrea Cellars was one of the very first Rhone producers in the state of Washington. Since the 90’s they’ve turned out award winning bottles, having opened when a paltry 5 acres of Syrah had been planted in the entire state.

Hi guys, Mark Aselstine with Uncorked Ventures.

This is something that I should have done quite a while ago I think. I enjoy Rhone varietals quite a bit and I’m also somebody who thinks that that state of Washington has a lot of really good things going on up in the Pacific Northwest. I think a lot of times people get accustomed to California wine because California makes about 90% of the total American production and especially on the cheap side almost all of it is kind of from California central valley and then as you start drinking more expensive wine and kind of branching out folks try local stuff but then they’re met with Oregon which can be kind of more austere than their planning and kind of feels like it’s coming out of left field a little bit.

The state of Washington is probably more similar to California as far as climate and growing conditions. So many people when they hear about Washington growing grapes they assume that you’re talking about Seattle and the rain and the whole kind of common wisdom that we have about the state. But when you go to the eastern part of the state it feels a lot like California. You know, Walla Walla is pretty darn hot over the summer. So that’s all to kind of segue to what amounts to the state of Washington’s first true producer of Rhone varietals, and this is McCrea Cellars. It’s owned by two couples but I’ll focus on Doug McCrea who makes the wine for them. Doug makes about 4,000 cases a year and they’re all Rhones.

We recently shipped an ’06 Viognier (it went into our Explorations Wine Club) from him and anytime you start talking about white wines that are 8 or 9 years old you start getting into the how is this holding up kind of thing. Viognier is a white where if you ask the French they’ll tell you it’s both the natural accompaniment to Syrah where in the Cotes du Rhone they will even add a small bit of Viognier in with the Syrah kind of on a consistent basis, but they’ll also tell you that the wine can lay down for quite a while. And that’s when we tasted these we thought that they were not only holding up well but they were a nice representation of what was happening in the state of Washington and not just 10 years ago. So this is the Ciel du Cheval vineyard and that’s also worth a mention here.

The Ciel du Cheval vineyard was one of the first vineyards in the state of Washington to both plant Viognier and Syrah. When we first opened Uncorked Ventures one of my first conversations actually with a Washington winemaker was Doug McCrea who I asked who distributes you guys, how do I get your wines? Because there’s all these requirements you have to go through to pull wine from one state to another including tax payments and all that kind of stuff. And Doug’s been really helpful over the years. Perhaps more helpful than he should have been both in setting me up with some of his wine but then also helping me find some other Washington producers that would fit what we’re trying to do. The Ciel du Cheval vineyard is one of the first. When Doug McCrea first started making wine at McCrea Cellars if you wanted to make a Syrah in the state of Washington, there was five acres planted and today’s there’s over 4,000. So I think that speaks to both the increasing quality but the increasing demand for what’s being produced and I think that over time you’re going to see more and more wineries spring up like this. I think this is a healthy thing for the industry, of course.

And McCrea Cellars, if you’re interested in learning a little bit about what is a short history of Washington wine to this point but also seeing where the Rhones are kind of going, increasingly in California we’re seeing this kind of rush to cooler climate conditions and we seem to go from the Syrah made is Napa is too thick and kind of too jammy for some high-end consumers to enjoy but if we can go to the Sonoma Coast then we’re fighting Pinot vineyards and that kind of stuff for space. I think the state of Washington is kind of a natural secondary market for this kind of stuff and I am hearing a few Napa winemakers or at least a few Sonoma winemakers who are talking about bringing grapes down from Washington to make wine with those. So I think it’s an interesting state of the industry right now and McCrea Cellars is definitely worth a look.

Anything that you want that’s a Rhone they probably make it. They make a Piquepoul which is incredibly rare in the United States and Cinsault too. So, once again, Mark Aselstine with Uncorked Ventures and this is a short intro to McCrea Cellars and the state of the Rhones in the state of Washington. Thanks again guys and as you’re no doubt heard before, I hope you’ll consider a wine club membership of your own!

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