Uncorked Ventures Blog

Mark Aselstine
 
May 24, 2011 | Mark Aselstine

Wine Blog Wednesday-Wine Harlots

One tough aspect about being based online, it’s sometimes difficult to meet some of the people that you speak with regularly through email, Facebook or Twitter. We’ve been lucky to spend some time with one half of the Wine Harlots at a couple of tasting events in and around San Diego and have always enjoyed the interactions.

Wine Harlots is one wine blog which we enjoy reading at Uncorked Ventures for a variety of reasons, but the biggest being that the Wine Harlots seem to really understand that consumers have different expectations based on prices that they pay for wine. It makes sense, but sometimes people in the business and some wine blogs seem to forget that your expectation for a $2 Chuck from Trader Joe’s is dramatically different than a $200 cult producer Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon.

We especially like the somewhat off beat and interesting reviews, such as their review of X winery from Napa Valley: “This is a wine fit for extraordinary divas and thirsty Wine Harlots. A seriously sophisticated quaff. The aroma of black fruit segues to the flavors of blackberry, black cherries, raspberry and spice on the palate with a lingering earthy toastiness on the finish. This is a rich and delicious wine. To complement the X Winery Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon, the perfect pairing is Donna Hay’s Warm Chili Beef Salad with Coriander Pesto.”

The bottom line: An interesting wine blog which is one of the very few to offers reviews at every price point you can imagine. They also include links to relevant recipes as well which is a nice touch if you’re looking for a complete meal.

Lastly, we couldn’t talk about the Wine Harlots without mentioning their social media success. Easily, one of the most influential bloggers on Twitter with over 18,000 followers they also filled up the 5,000 friend allotment on their Facebook account which led to the creation of their new fan page.

Mark Aselstine
 
May 24, 2011 | Mark Aselstine

Premiere Napa Valley

Premiere Napa Valley

Every year the Napa Valley Vintners Association holds Premiere Napa Valley, a live auction event where various lots of wine are sold with the proceeds going to charity. This is hardly your high school’s gala though, as $2.4 million was raised this year in what amounts to the highest ever take for the event.

Many people consider the day of barrel sampling and then bidding to be the best barometer of fine wine sales during the upcoming year. Many of the wines on display are already sold out, meaning for a retailer to find an allocation there is no other choice than to bid at the auction.

While we don’t necessarily agree that this is a great barometer for fine wine sales as a 5 case offering from Scarecrow wine netted a $125,000 donation from a Tokyo based wine distributor (over 2k per bottle) we are comfortable in saying, increasing prices at auction is a healthy sign for an industry which has had difficult times during the past two years.

Taking a little something from the official press release, we do think it’s informative to see which wines are garnering the highest bids: “Rounding out the top ten highest earning lots of the day include Schrader Cellars, Ovid, first-time Premiere-participating winery, Levy and McClellan, Shafer Vineyards, Robert Mondavi Winery, Reynolds Family Winery, Duckhorn Vineyards, Silver Oak Cellars and Beringer Vineyards”

I think you can agree that the list of highest earning wineries shows an industry both in touch with its past (Mondavi and Beringer) as well as with upcoming names in Reynolds Family and Ovid.

Time Posted: May 24, 2011 at 6:29 PM
Mark Aselstine
 
May 24, 2011 | Mark Aselstine

Languedoc from Facebook

One of the aspects I like about our business is the ability to interact with customers and our Facebook Page offers that in a familiar format.

A good friend and Wine Exploration Wine Club member had the following to say:

“I am enjoying my second glass of the Domaine de Nizas GSM blend…one of my favorites from the wine club so far!”

First, thanks for the kind words Heather. We thought it was an interesting example of a GSM blend from a wine region which is still relatively unknown to American consumers.

Languedoc has been overshadowed for centuries by its more famous neighbors including Bordeaux, Burgundy, Champagne and even the Rhone Valley but the Languedoc is now becoming known as the area to look for to see experimentation and innovation in French wine.

To start, the Languedoc is huge. It currently produces about a third of all the wine crafted each year in France. For that reason, the region was once making wine which was cheaper than water for French citizens. The French government went so far during the world wars to provide a daily ration of the wine to its soldiers.

All of that changed in the 1980’s when a group of creative vintners realized that the climate in the Languedoc was very similar to the Southern Rhone Valley and Provence. It’s a warm climate which makes it incredibly easy to grow grapes which is both a blessing and a curse at the same time. Grapes which don’t struggle, hardly if ever make incredible wine. The question quickly became, how can vineyard sites be situated so that the night time temperatures allow the grapes to regain their acidity? As in many wine regions, the answer came with both altitude and the influence from a nearby body of water.

The top vineyards of the Languedoc are located in the foothill mountains overlooking the Mediterranean Sea. We had wanted to feature a GSM blend from the area because those varieties of grape are being planted in dramatically more places, but quality levels are also soaring. Plus, since many international consumers aren’t yet aware of the area prices are significantly less than a similar quality of wine being produced in the Rhone Valley.

Mark Aselstine
 
May 24, 2011 | Mark Aselstine

Quivet Cellars

Every once in a while we find a wine which just seems almost too good to be true.

We found one of those wines for our Special Selections customers in February.

Quivet Cellars is a project from winemaker Mike Smith who got his start under one of the best tutors in all of Napa Valley, Thomas Browne who is responsible for the award winning wines at Schrader Cellars. Mike’s journey has been well chronicled in and of itself, but suffice to say we have a ton of respect for anyone willing to get started in the wine industry by driving to Napa every weekend from your family home in Oregon and working for free.

We always like to include an impartial review, so here is what famed wine critic Robert Parker had to say:

“Myriad and Quivet from Mike Smith. I cannot say enough good things about the Myriad and Quivet wines from Mike Smith. I have mentioned this before, if you are not on their mailing list, sign-up today. These wine rock and the pricing is extremely reasonable.”
- Robert Parker online 2/14/2008

We couldn’t agree more.

The wine we selected for our Special Selection Wine Club members is the Kenefick Ranch Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon. We thought this would be a good fit of four choices from Quivet for a couple of reasons. To start, the Kenefick Ranch is on the Napa Valley floor in really, really good real estate. The Eisele Vineyard of Araujo is just a few yards away which shows how good this fruit really is. We know our club members open their wines shortly after receiving them, so we chose a wine from the Valley floor instead of mountain fruit which can be more condensed and tannic and might necessitate cellaring for some time.

Lastly, Quivet gives a good example of how we find wine. We originally started talking to Chris Maybach the Proprietor of Maybach Family Vineyards. Of course an allocation of Maybach is incredibly difficult to assertain as they have a waiting list for their own wine club which is approaching a decade, but during our conversations Chris mentioned that one of Thomas Browne’s crew had his own label. Mike Smith was that crew member and Quivet was that label. For that, thank you Chris we appreciate being pointed in the right direction.

Mark Aselstine
 
May 24, 2011 | Mark Aselstine

End of an Era-Parker to no longer review new California Vintages

One of the least understood facts in the wine trade is that Robert Parker doesn’t review every wine listed in Robert Parker’s Wine Advocate. For years the publication has been the foremost authority on fine wine throughout the world and Parker’s affinity for both Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon and all things Bordeaux have helped those two regions gain even further market share during the last two decades.

It was with great sadness that we saw Parker’s decision to retire from reviewing current California vintages on Feb 1st, 2011. He’ll continue on with Bordreaux and with older California vintages, but this is really the end of an area.

For a man responsible for so much growth and change within the wine industry, we’re always been impressed with Parker’s ability to keep a level head about wine and wine critics. The long term implications for California wines are certainly unknown, but it’ll likely be years before the influence of Wine Advocate begins to wane, if it ever does.

Personally, we’re glad to see some added attention being paid to wine years after it was left in a cellar. There is perhaps nothing more frustrating than savoring a bottle for a generation, only to open it and be under whelmed by the entire experience. Here is hoping Parker can revolutionize cellared wine in the same way he did new releases with his once ground breaking 100 point scale.

“Dear eRobertParker.com Subscriber:

I am thrilled to announce that Antonio Galloni will have expanded responsibilities for The Wine Advocate and http://www.eRobertParker.com as of February 1, 2011. I would like to take credit for my powers of persuasion over recent years in trying to convince Antonio of the virtues of covering additional wine regions, but if truth be known, the writing was always on the wall that his enviable talents and passion for this field would ultimately prevail, and the beneficiaries are the world’s wine consumers.

Antonio will continue to focus on the wines of Italy as well as Champagne, but two new areas of responsibility for Antonio will include the red and white Burgundies of the Côte d’Or as well as the crisp white wines of Chablis, and the wines of California. These vast regions will benefit from the increased depth of coverage, as will all the major wine regions of the world.

Additionally, sectors that merit dramatically more attention but have not had sufficient coverage, including Beaujolais and the Mâconnais (now economically as important as the Cote d’Or and Chablis) will be put under a microscope by David Schildknecht, who will continue with his other areas of responsibility but will be freed from covering the Cote d’Or and Chablis.

I will turn to something I have long played around with in The Wine Advocate but have rarely had enough time to do. Older readers may remember the vintage retrospectives called “What About Now?” With Antonio turning his attention to California, I am going to begin a series of horizontal and vertical tastings of perfectly stored California wines that will give readers insight into how they are developing. It has been a long-term ambition of mine to include more reports on older vintages, and this change will allow me to do this not only in California, but also to increase the older vintage reports for Bordeaux and the Rhône Valley.

In all other respects, the staff assignments at The Wine Advocate remain identical. I hope all of you share our great enthusiasm for the fact that Antonio Galloni has finally taken the plunge and will be devoting most of his time to his wine writing career, a job for which he seems particularly well-suited and sure to excel.

All the best in wine and life,
Robert M. Parker, Jr.

P.S. The Wine Advocate writer assignments are:

Robert Parker – Bordeaux, the Rhône Valley, older vintages of Bordeaux, Rhône and California wines
Antonio Galloni – Italy, Champagne, Chablis, Côte d’Or, California
David Schildknecht – Germany, Loire, Beaujolais and Mâconnais, Eastern U.S., Austria,
Eastern Europe, Languedoc-Roussillon, Jura
Jay Miller – Oregon, Washington, South America, Spain
Lisa Perrotti – Brown – Australia, New Zealand
Neal Martin – Critic-at-Large overlapping all areas, plus specific reviewer of South Africa
Mark Squires – Bulletin Board supervision and occasional articles on Israel, Portugal, and Greece