Mark Aselstine
 
February 6, 2014 | Wine Critics of 2020 | Mark Aselstine

Wine Folly

Earlier today, we made an addition to our blogroll, so we wanted to take a moment to introduce Wine Folly.  It’s worth a read for a number of reasons, but I can sum it up pretty quickly-Wine Folly is not only the best looking wine blog out there, but it’s also the one that serves as an aspirational example of what’s possible, while being approachable at the same time.

Owned by Madeline Puckette Wine Folly does at least one thing that I absolutely love and that I wish I could do a better job in this space.  Namely the informational wine charts from Wine Folly are the best in the business (she sells them, typically under $20) and are the only examples I can think of, that would fit in well in high end cellars, man caves and offices anywhere in the world. I’d add living room’s, but my wife has to draw the line somewhere.

I’ll let you browse Wine Folly’s impressive blog for great examples, but there are three posts I can’t help but comment on.  Recently they wrote about cork vs screwcaps and while I agree with the premise, the end conclusion is really, really astute from someone who doesn’t actually sell wine.  The most pressing issue facing the wine industry is that it costs so damn much to ship wine.  I realize that cork is becoming something of a major topic of conversation, but my customers are still paying $14 on average to have 2 bottles of wine shipped to them.  If direct to consumer sales are going to continue rising 10%+ per year going forward, it’s a major issue.  Of course, not being charged an additional $5 per shipment for an adult signature would certainly help with the costs associated Fedex! Also, the note that having the wine industry continue being as environmentally efficient as possible is important moving forward.  No matter where you fall on global warming and water rights (let’s be honest, the science of both is settled), I think it is fair to say that the wine industry is going to be adversely affected more so than other industries by any degradation in the overall climate so taking a more central role in helping to control global warming and waste is something the industry should be thinking about doing.  Rising temperatures, I know for a fact, are a topic of conversation among Napa winemakers.

Another two entries that I found especially interesting and insightful was their map of Italian wine regions and a similar post about Sonoma wine.  Look, summing up Italian wine in a couple of thousand words is impossible, I think the Italians like it that way though and let’s be clear, I love Italy.  Breaking down the regions to the types of grapes typically sold with a couple of quick sentences as a guide is really helpful.  Sonoma is set up much the same way and I think, the map of Sonoma wine shows exactly why people are first drawn to Napa Valley-it’s simpler to understand Napa Valley wine than it is Sonoma wine.  That being said, one addition which I’d think would interest Wine Folly’s readers, would be a short additional section highlighting a winery or two in each region to try if you were so inclined.  Maybe I focus a bit too much on the profiles of individual wineries in this space, but I’d love to hear Madeline’s take on certain winemakers and wineries that she’s come across.

I hope you’ll take the time to check out Wine Folly.  From both a quality and frequency perspective, it truly is one of the best and most engaging wine blogs you’re likely to find anywhere.

Written by Mark Aselstine

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