Mark Aselstine
 
March 3, 2014 | Napa Valley | Mark Aselstine

Porter Family Vineyards

Porter Family Vineyards LogoPorter Family Vineyards is one of the most unique and interesting wineries in Napa Valley.  Located in the cool climate region of Coombsville, which I’ve talked about a bit in recent days, the defining aspect of Porter Family Vineyards is a rather large hill in the center of the vineyard. Lying within that hill is the 17,000 square foot winery that is now producing world class wines.

While other, perhaps better known properties in Rutherford and elsewhere in Napa are constantly trying to create these wine caves, which according to many within the industry, are the optimum way to both make wine, but also to age wine before its release, Porter Family Vineyards has one of the best natural setups I’ve had the opportunity to come across.

I ran into Porter Family Vineyards for the first time during a trip to the Ferry Building in San Francisco which seems to have been a bit of luck given that distribution for Porter is more heavily centered in Florida, rather than here in the Bay Area at least based on some of the distribution models that I’ve been able to dig up.

Tom and Beverly Porter have a story like many others, they moved to Napa to have a bit of peace and contentment in an otherwise busy world. Scientists by trade (Tom quite famously helped patent some of the technology that sits within every 3.5 inch floppy disk, as well as helping design the automated ticketing system for BART that gives my 3 year old no shortage of amusement when he knows how to put his ticket in and the tourists seemingly have problems) they seemingly couldn’t have been happy with simply making a bit of wine for themselves and family members, once they realized that they had something special on their hands.  The way that the family speaks in deference to a set of fossilized sandpiper tracks that they found on the property, I think helps to show that this is a different family than many others in Napa in both their long term goals for the property, but also the fact that they are bringing a sort of scientific method of study to their families winemaking venture. That combination of a long range way of looking at a winery project, shown both by putting the winery into the hill itself (not a cheap venture, to be sure) as well as putting their own name on the label, helps to explain that this is a wine project that is being made, to exist for quite some time. The Porter’s children, Heather and Tim, both of which have had careers of their own before being drawn to the winery project, also help run the day to day operations of the winery bringing a wide and diverse set of skills of their own to the project. Heather spends part of her time as their assistant winemaker while Tim helps to handle the winery's financials, an increasingly complicated and time consuming job for many projects these days.


This photo of Perata Luxury Tours - Private Wine Country Tours is courtesy of TripAdvisor

Of course, any amount of passion from owners doesn’t help, without the help of an outstanding winemaker.  Ken Bernards needs perhaps no introduction to the hard core oenophile, but a brief background shows a stop as onologist at Domaine Chandon and then a full career making world renowned Pinot Noir at Ancien Wines. Bernards continuing as winemaker once the Porter Family bought the property makes a ton of sense when you consider his background in Chemistry. This is the only winery website that I’ve ever seen that includes quotes from books like, John Reader, Missing Links: The Hunt for Earliest Man

Lastly, I don’t want to leave our readers without a mention and highlight of the philanthropic nature of the winery itself.  Besides supporting a number of interesting and unique causes from the Napa Valley Food Bank to the Michigan Tech Fund, the family makes a wine called Amani.  This is pretty unique in the world of wine where wineries will sometimes make a wine and donate the profits, or a few dollars per sale.  The Porter Family donates the entire $28 purchase price per bottle to the Amani Children’s Home in Tanzania. Focused on not only rescuing children from a life on the street, but giving them a warm, safe and comfortable opportunity to build a new life for themselves afterward, it’s hard to think of a more worth endeavor for a wine.

Ok, so lastly a word about the wine.  This is classic Coombsville in many ways.  Cooler Cabernet Sauvignon meets Syrah and even a Rose and Chardonnay. Wine Spectator has consistently rated the wine at 90 points or above, noting strong and chewy tannins across multiple vintages-a highlight of cooler climate growing regions throughout Napa, especially Coombsville.

All of this is to say, this is clearly a winery worth of checking out and the next time you feel like ordering a few $30 bottles, Amani sounds like a nice way to do that doesn’t it?

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