Mark Aselstine
 
January 25, 2014 | Mark Aselstine

Easton Wines H House Red

About Easton Wines: A standout among Sierra Nevada Foothills growers for well over a generation, Bill Easton is among the only growers in the region willing to take chances and produce wines that don’t encompass Zinfandel (the grape, which to this day, still will spring up wild among the hillsides).  Splitting the winery between Rhone varietals and non Rhones helped Easton to keep things easy for wine sellers and has helped the winery grow in ways that a decade ago, no one thought was possible in the foothills.  I will note that Easton put his name on the part of the winery that crafts the non Rhone varietals and calls this his wife’s favorite wine, so I’ll let you have a guess at the quality. With multiple wines during almost every vintage rated at 90 points and above Easton and its sister label (Tierre Rouge) deserves a look when you’re ready to branch out from the uncountable number of choices available in Napa Valley, Sonoma, Santa Barbara and Paso Robles.
 

H House Red Tasting Notes: A blend of Cabernet Sauvignon and Syrah which originally came to the forefront of the wine industry from Languedoc France (virtually the only region of the country where new blends are legally possible) the Easton H House Red aims to be an easy drinking, easy choice for a wine any day of the week. I believe you’ll note the standard California Cabernet in play here, solid structure but not overly dramatic in a way that destroys everything around it (like many complain about South American wine) also you’ll note the zesty and spicy flavors that are reminiscent of Syrah very much at the forefront as you get through the bottle.
 

About Sierra Foothills Wine: When it comes to California wine, there isn’t an older growing region than the Sierra Foothills.  When settlers first came looking for their fortunes in the gold covered hills of the Sierra Nevada, they found wild vines growing along their route from San Francisco into the foothills.  Those vines encompassed Zinfandel to be sure, but also Petite Sirah and at least three other grapes.

 

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