Mark Aselstine
 
June 24, 2013 | Mark Aselstine

Chronicle Wines Cerise Pinot Noir

Chronicle Wines Pinot NoirEvery so often we find a winery and think, if we could make wine, we’d want it to be like this.

Chronicle Wines is one of those wineries.

We had previously featured their Savoy Vineyard Pinot Noir in our Special Selections Wine Club and the reaction to it was superb.  I think we’ve received more positive comments about this wine than we have any other Pinot Noir that we’ve shipped in 3+ years.  Matt and I enjoyed the wine enough to have a bit of a “discussion” about where our last bottle should go.  To a paying customer? To me? To him? To be enjoyed the two of us? To be enjoyed with our wives?

In any case, I wish we could make the case that we found Chronicle through some great exploration, but 94 point scores don’t grow on trees, even when you’re considering one of the most famous Anderson Valley vineyards in existence, so there’s that.  Plus, one of our favorite questions to ask winemaker and winery staff that we meet is quite simple: What are you drinking?  After we heard Chronicle come out the mouth of the 5th person in Sonoma, we thought that it might be a good time to find a way to get some of the wine for our customers.

We were incredibly happy to have been selected to offer their Cerise Vineyard Pinot Noir to our wine club customers this month. We said it in our newsletter and we’ll say it again in this space, but Chronicle did a better job explaining the Cerise Vineyard than we ever could, so we’ll share their work here:

Cerise Vineyard is located between 800 and 1200 feet above the floor of Anderson Valley looking down on the little town of Boonville.  The vines are planted on a series of steep slopes facing south, and all farmed organically.  There are 40 acres total, scattered on a series of small, clonal blocks, generally each no larger than a few acres.  They are quite exposed to both fog and cooling breezes from the ocean. The soils here are thin, hard and quite marginal, a blend of sandstones and fractured shale. The property is full of sunken boulders and bedrock that fractures only under great stress. If the old adage that great wines come from poor soils is true, then this site is the real deal.  The vines struggle to produce two tons per acre in the very best years.

In many ways what we have here (and what you hopefully have in your glass) is in many ways the quintessential Anderson Valley Pinot Noir.  If you consider this part of Sonoma to be one of the predominant Pinot production regions in the world, this is why.  The Pinot produced by excellent Anderson Valley vineyards aren’t the lighter versions valued by other regions around the world, but in many they are darker and more brooding than you can find elsewhere.  Chronicle describes their Pinot’s as having dark fruit flavors, which even the mention of in Burgundy might be heresy.

The reasons for that darkness are certainly sketched out above, but vines forced to struggle as much as these tend to produce both smaller yields and also smaller fruit.  Smaller fruit is a key consideration here and I think isn’t given enough attention for how flavors are imparted to wine.  If you think about the amount of grape skins available to impart flavors into wine, there are more skins in a ton of these grapes than there are on from other vineyard sites in the Anderson Valley, or really anywhere else in the world. More skins produce more flavor and more skins also produce darker wine.  After all, red wine isn’t really red until it spends some time in contact with the grape skins. Additionally, the Anderson Valley has darker versions of Pinot because of the fog and cold that happens on the Sonoma coast, but all of that struggle is accented by the vineyard itself here.

Going forward, we’re excited to see what happens at Chronicle.  They have released an Anderson Valley Pinot blend, which we think is going to end up a nice addition for their lineup, especially at a more wallet friendly price of $44. That’s a significant discount from their single vineyard offerings and places them $11 short of what we see the average Pinot marked as Anderson Valley from other well known and respected producers.

There is also a Chardonnay this year for the first time ($35) which I will admit, to not having had the chance to taste myself as of yet.  We’ve certainly moved out of the day of Chardonnay in California, but again it’s nice to have a white wine offering and frankly, the story will bring in plenty of customers by itself:

This marks my inaugural Chardonnay release under Chronicle. My Dad Jim first planted our home vineyard in 1982, on a 14-acre plateau nestled into the mountain in the cool southwest portion of Sonoma Valley. The vineyard thrived for twenty years under his guidance, until his passing in 2002.


"I've long wanted to produce a wine from that fruit, given the deep connection I have to that site and to my Dad."


Given that one of the reasons Matt and I wanted to get into the wine business was to create a business of value that we could eventually pass on to our children, I feel a certain attachment to the story of Chronicle’s Chardonnay.

So I hope I’ve done a good job extolling the virtues of Chronicle.  At it’s core, this is pretty simple.  This is exactly the type of small production winery that we’re all clamoring for.

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