Mark Aselstine
 
June 27, 2013 | Mark Aselstine

Cartograph Wines

A few weeks ago I had the opportunity to sit down with Alan Baker and Serena Lourie who are the husband and wife team behind Cartograph wines. Their story is an interesting one in itself, Alan came to California’s wine country via public radio in Minnesota, bitten by the wine bug like so many others, myself included.  He met Serena during his time at a custom crush facility in San Francisco, where after a few vintages he was tasked with helping first time winemakers who were making wine as a fun side project. One of his projects was being the assistant winemaker for Serena who remembered the days of fresh locally grown food and wine from her family home outside of Prentrez France, a small town on the northwestern edge of the country. They came together to craft a single barrel of Pinot Noir for that vintage and reportedly, the idea behind Cartograph was planted.

Cartograph was a personal recommendation from William Allen at Two Shepherds and has come highly recommended from a handful of other sources as well.  I was excited to get the chance to meet the people behind the wine and of course, to see if anything they make would be a fit in one of our wine clubs.

Cartograph is in the process of moving their tasting room from a shared facility to their own space, only a few blocks off the main square in Healdsburg.  While we haven’t talked about Healdsburg much in this space before, it’s clearly the crown jewel of tourist sites in Sonoma County and offers a range of interesting and unique restaurants and shops. Additionally Alan mentioned that there are a number of other high end Pinot Noir producers opening tasting room’s in the area, making a sort of Pinot Noir alley in the middle of Healdsburg.  We’re excited for it.

When I saw their tasting room, it was in essence a large empty space.  The floor was marked for where the walls would be placed to create a wine club only tasting area as well as space to sell some additionally products in accordance with the city’s specifications. Seeing the marks on floor made me remember when I was a kid and my parents had found a space to open a Dairy Queen, the space they opened in had previously been occupied by a scrapbook store which had added an additional set of walls.  Taking those extra walls down via sledgehammer is still one of the best times that any 9 year old could possibly have.

In any case, I had the opportunity to taste two of Cartograph’s wines: their Gewurztaminer which was shipped in our Exploration Wine Club this month as well as one of their Pinot Noir offerings.

Cartograph has an interesting and perhaps even an eclectic winemaking style at play.  The Gewurztaminer is a dry version of the varietal, which isn’t often seen outside of the Alsace France.  Alsace is located in the far eastern corner of the country, so the focus in this cooler climate are white wine’s, especially Gewurztaminer and Riesling.  Unlike their nearby German neighbors though, Alsace crafts dry white wine’s while Germany’s are typically sweet.  We mention all this to simply say that finding a dry Gewurztaminer isn’t exactly an easy proposition even in the old world, let alone in California where it is virtually unheard of.

The Pinot Noir had a similar old world style.  It was among the most Burgundian I have tasted in California.  As you probably realize, crafting a true Burgundian Pinot in Sonoma isn’t exactly the easiest task in the world.  While vines in Burgundy consistently struggle to reach full ripeness, which is never an issue in our California sun. 

There are some ways and choices of course, that a winemaker can make in order to get as close to Burgundian growing conditions as possible even on California’s coast.  One of those choices means finding vineyards which are both close to the cooling influences of the Pacific Ocean, but when we’re talking about Sonoma, finding a vineyard in close proximity to the Russian River itself as well. The best example here is Cartograph’s Floogate Vineyard Pinot Noir, which comes from a vineyard which sits at the southern end of the river’s flood plane.  Being situated in the flood plane means that the soil is incredible from centuries of natural irrigation, has an accessible water table, but more than anything else, is cooler than many vineyards in and around Sonoma.  The vineyard also sits almost directly east of the famed Petaluma Gap which is one of the few breaks in the coastal mountains of Sonoma and allows fog and other maritime influences to help cool the vineyard even further.  The end result from the coastal and river influences is a vineyard site, among the coolest in inland Sonoma.  Unlike some coastal vineyards, ripeness is achieved, but without a higher than wanted acidity.

Other than the wine and the story behind Cartograph, we wanted to feature the winery both in this space as well as with our wine club members because they’re both willing and seem to enjoy interacting with people, both in the trade and outside of it in person and via social media.  Alan was quoted in a USA Today article having said

"Good wine is simply the starting point," Baker says. "If you make good wine, you've got a shot. But this is about creating a relationship with people."

It’s the type of attitude that consumers wish was more prevalent in the wine industry.  I can feel comfortable sending my friends who enjoy studying wine to Cartograph because there are plenty of interesting wine geeky things happening here, but my friends who are also more likely to have a beer at Russian River Brewing Company than to pay for corkage at Bistro Ralph, would also feel welcome in this tasting room.  Creating a space and a winery which works for both sets of people isn’t easily done and I can applaude Cartograph for pulling it off.

Oh and a sense of humor is a good thing:

 

Comments

Alan Baker's Gravatar
 
Alan Baker
@ Jun 27, 2013 at 11:12 AM
Thanks so much for the kind words Mark. We're very excited to get the tasting room open. All of our licensing is now complete and so we're organizing some tastings in the raw space. We might have to dodge some nail gun action and dry wall mud splashes but anyone interested in tasting should reach out and see if we can pull something together. Alan Baker, winemaker Cartographwines.com @cartographwines

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